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Genus Hadogenes (kraepelin, 1874)

On standby of informations for a lot of species, thank you of your indulgence...

   
Index of danger
Hadogenes genus is composed of:  
Hadogenes angolensis Lourenço, 1999 Angola.  
  • In search of informations
Hadogenes austroafricanus Penther, 1900 Zimbabwe.  
  • In search of informations
Hadogenes bicolor Purcell, 1899 South Africa. 18-20 15-17
  • Scorpions of large size, females are up to 9 cm, and the males over 13 cm. Hadogenes bicolor is the sister species of H. longimanus. Thes two species are both characterized by a pronounced lobe, distal to the notch in the fixed finger of the pedipalp chela of adult male and female, and a relatively short metasoma in the adult female. Hadogenes bicolor can be separated from H. longimanus by the presence of two, rather than 5-8, trichobothria on the internal surface of the pedipalp chela. Color: pale chelicerae, legs and telson contrasting markedly with darker carapace, pedipalps, tergites and metasomal segments I-V. Sternites also paler than tergites and metasomal segments.
Hadogenes bifossulatus Roewer, 1943 Namibia.  
  • In search of informations
Hadogenes gracilis Hewitt, 1909 South Africa.  
  • In search of informations
Hadogenes granulatus Purcell, 1901 Bostwana, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe.  
  • In search of informations
Hadogenes gunnigi Purcell, 1899 South Africa.  
  • In search of informations
Hadogenes hahni (Peters, 1862)  
  • In search of informations
Hadogenes lawrencei Newlands, 1972 Namibia.  
  • Small species, the specimens are 5 cm long. (In search of additional information).
Hadogenes longimanus Prendini, 2001 South Africa. 22-23 15-19
  • Hadogenes longimanus is the sister species of H. bicolor. These two species are both caracterized by a pronounced lobe, distal to the notch in the fixed finger of the pedipalp chela of adult male and female, and the relatively short metasoma in the adult male, compared with other Hadogenes. Hadogenes longimanus can be distinguished from H. bicolor, and from H. newlandsi, by the presence of 5-8 trichobotria on the internal surface of the pedipalp chela. Color: legs and tergites I-VI slightly paler, but not contrasting markedly with pedipalps, carapace, tergite VII and metasoma. Telson not distinctly paler than metasomal segments I-V. Sternites distinctly paler than tergites and metasoma. The females are darker than the males. Size: the females are up to 9 cm and male can reach 14 cm.
Hadogenes minor Purcell, 1899 South Africa.  
  • In search of informations
Hadogenes newlansdi Prendini, 2001 South Africa. 21-23 16-18
  • Hadogenes newlandsi is most closely related to the group comprising H. bicolor and H. longimanus. In all three species, the distal width of metasomal segment I is greater than the height. Hadogenes newlandsi can be distinguished from the latter species by the absence of a pronounced lobe, distal to the notch in the fixed finger of the pedipalp chela of adult male and female, nad by the longer metasoma of the adult male. This species is further characterized by the presence, in adult male, of dense granulation on the telson and lateral surface of metasomal segment V. Size : female are up to 7,5 cm, and male over 15 cm. Color: pale legs contrasting markedly with darker pedipalps, carapce, tergites and metasoma. Telson not distinctly paler than metasomal segments I-V. Sternites distinctly paler than tergites and metasoma.
Hadogenes paucidens Pocock, 1896 Rep. Dem. Congo, Tanzania?.  
  • In search of informations
Hadogenes phyllodes Thorell, 1876 South Africa, Namibia. 16-18 13-14
  • Color variable according to the origin but in general the body, the pedipalps and the metasoma are dark brown to brown tobacco, with the telson yellow straw at the old specimens. The legs are yellow orange, rather clear.
Hadogenes tityrus (Simon, 1888) South Africa, Namibia. 11-17 6-13
  • Scorpion of color brownish, more clearly between each plate of the mesosoma. Metasoma, legs and pedipalps more clearly (yellowish orange) with the fingers black. Aculeus a little clearer than the legs. Some specimens are however darker.
Hadogenes trichiurus (Gervais, 1843) South Africa.  
  • In search of informations
Hadogenes troglodytes (Peters, 1861) South Africa, Botswana, Mozambique, Zimbabwe.  
  • In search of informations
Hadogenes zuluanus Lawrence, 1937 South Africa, Swaziland.  
  • In search of informations
Hadogenes zumpti Newlands & Cantrell, 1985 South Africa, Namibia?  
  • In search of informations

Note : For these species the sexual dimorphism being very obvious (metasoma much longer in the male), the number of teeth of comb is really additional

The Breeding

Temperature:

This kind of scorpion easily tolerates temperatures of more than 35°C, however, in breeding 30°C will be enough, with, for the night, a fall of at least 10°C if possible. For the species who's live in South Africa, a winter diapause is welcome. At this time, a temperature of 15/20°C would be then preferable. To grow correctly, the young Hadogenes one need for temperatures often nearer to the 35°C because at a temperature of 22/24°C no moult is carried out.

Food:

The crickets will be the base of the breeding supply. However, adults, these species will eat without problem of the cockroaches, the locusts, the lizards, the myriapodes and even of the small rodents. It also appears that in the event of food shortage, in their country of origin, some of these scorpions would eat snails. For the babies, the micro-crickets will make the deal. Hadogenes are not big eaters, he is frequently able that the prey is forsaken during one week, to see more, before it does not disappear. Also you do not worry too much. These scorpions have a great longevity, but also a very slow growth.

Terrarium:

Hadogenes are scorpions living in rocky area. One finds them in the cracks, from where forms to them so special, which did not plait in all the world. One will thus need a terrarium of big size, and solid, with much of stones punts (slate kind, or others). These stones will be they, posed on a substrate made up of argillaceous ground or dry peat, but especially not on sand. For this kind of scorpion, the terrariums quickly become very heavy, therefore made attention in the event of displacement. Hygroscopy 30-50%, rather dry with nevertheless a feeding trough at disposal. In their country of origin, it only falls very little from water during the year. One can however vaporize the stones and the walls of terrarium in order to water the specimen occasionally. However for the alive species plus meadows of equator (Tanzania, RD Congo etc...) needs much more moisture. One will more often vaporize, and one will keep the wetter substrate. It is possible to make cohabit several Hadogenes together, this species is regarded as rather sociable and calms. However one should not mix between various species of Hadogenes and food must be in quantity sufficient for all the scorpions.

Sociability:

Hadogenes are for the rather sociable majority of the scorpions. One can keep a couple without problem. One will only take care to isolate the male before a birth. The stress because of the presence of this one, could like reaction the setting with have died of the pullus by the female. The size of these scorpions makes that if you want to put several couples together, you will need a very large terrarium. Indeed, the competitions male/male and female/female generates fights, often invalidating to see mortals for weakest. For better a growth and to avoid any canibalism, the youngs will be isolated, put out of pot individually.

Note:

Hadogenes are not so inoffensive. Admittedly the thickness of the metasoma and the length of the aculeus show that the puncture is not what it is necessary to fear more, but not to never leave your fingers carry grips of these scorpions. The power is such as it can cut you until the bone. Attention thus...

References :

  • Fet, Victor, Sissom, W. David, Lowe, Graeme & Braunwalder, Matt E. CATALOG OF THE SCORPIONS OF THE WORLD, 2000. The New York Entomological Society.
  • Lamoral, Bruno H., THE SCORPIONS OF NAMIBIA (ARACHNIDA: SCORPIONES), 1979 Ann. Natal. Mus. Vol. 23(3).
  • Prendini, Lorenzo, Two new species of Hadogenes (scorpiones, ischnuridae) from South Africa, with a description of Hadogenes bicolor and a discussion on the phylogenetic position of Hadogenes. The Journal of Arachnology 29:146-172. 2001
  • Rein, Jan Ove , The Scorpion Files
Last update 10/13/2005
 

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